GIBSON ISLAND HISTORICAL SOCIETY

1700 Skippers’ Row
P.O. Box 85
Gibson Island, Maryland 21056
410-437-5270

gihs@gibsonisland.com


Open House: The Salty Marks Museum is open the first Sunday of each month from 2:00 to 4:00 p.m.

ANNUAL MEETING - SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 28th, 5:00 p.m., Salty Marks Museum

Re-dedication of the Symington Monument - PICTURES 


 

The Gibson Island Historical Society (GIHS) was established in 1969 by a group of Islanders who were concerned that the memorabilia and artifacts of this unique community would be lost without a proper place to house them. Its home is the Salty Marks Museum house (itself a relic) at the far western end of Skippers’ Row, opposite the Yacht Yard.

The Society’s primary focus is the present Island community in all its aspects, the Club, Yacht Squadron, and Corporation, established by the Symington family in 1921. Yet its collections go back to pre-historic times and the habitation of the Island before the 20th century. In addition to housing collections from all Island events and periods, the Society annually sponsors historical programs for its members and friends, and archaeological research into the Island’s historical mysteries.

The Socie
ty holds open houses at the Salty Marks Museum from 2:00 – 4:00 p.m. on the first Sunday of every month except January, and at other times by appointment. Appointments can be made by contacting any Society Trustee. Their telephone numbers and e-mails are available in the Club and Corporation membership lists.

The Society needs a strong membership to fund its maintenance responsibilities, the buildings and grounds of the Salty Marks Museum and Lighthouse, and the Symington Monument, as well as our historical programming and archaeological research. Membership information can be obtained from the Club/Corporation office or from any member of the Board. The applications themselves can be picked up at the office.

This beautiful Island has not been preserved for us by accident but by the thoughtfulness, hard labor, struggles, and compromises of many generations. We can learn from this history and, hopefully, Gibson Island will remain a very special place for generations to enjoy much as we do today.